Southern Refrigerated Transport tractor trailer

Southern Refrigerated Transport drivers to haul in largest pay raise in firm’s history

More money, no tricks. That’s the message Southern Refrigerated Transport (SRT) officials are sending drivers with the announcement of a pay increase that will result, depending on years of experience, in an up to 6-cent-per-mile increase for mileage-based drivers.

The pay increase is the largest of its kind at SRT in more than 30 years in business, and it comes on the heels of a 1-cent-per-mile driver pay hike that rolled out in October 2017.

Billy Cartright, chief operating officer at SRT, said the recent pay increases reflect the company’s dedication to treating its people right and to ensuring SRT is a great place to work for both current and future drivers.

“Our drivers didn’t want another bonus, which you see so often throughout the industry,” he said. “They wanted a pay increase they can see every week on their paycheck.”

Cartright said the good news for SRT drivers doesn’t end with simply making more money. Utilization at the company is up, which means drivers can expect to make more money and move more miles in 2018.

Terri Lafayette, director of recruiting at SRT, said that combined with existing bonuses—which pay up to 12 cents per mile—and recently announced winter holiday pay, this driver pay raise also helps set SRT apart from the pack when it comes to recruiting new drivers. At SRT, Lafayette feels the company has its priorities straight.

“Our drivers are the backbone of everything we do,” she said. “Without them, none of the rest of us would be here. So it’s fitting we show them how important they are to us—and to SRT.”

The new pay raise is adjusted for factors including experience and tenure with the company, and officially goes into effect for all mileage-based SRT drivers March 11. To learn more or to apply for a driving job, go to www.southernref.com.

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