Zeitner and Sons pick Kenworth T700s

Zeitner and Sons pick Kenworth T700s

One of the Midwest’s leading refrigerated carriers, Zeitner and Sons Inc in Omaha NE, operates a fleet of 100 trucks, mostly Kenworth T660s and T2000s. Each week, Zeitner trucks load fresh Midwestern meats for delivery to customers as far away as New York and Washington state.

“When we first heard about the new Kenworth T700, we thought we might be interested in buying one,” said Allen Zeitner, son of company founder Rallen Zeitner. “We ended up purchasing two!”

The Zeitners have been purchasing Kenworth trucks for more than three decades. “I bought my first Kenworth truck on February 23, 1977,” said Rallen. “I followed that purchase with five or six more KWs. Over the years, I’ve mixed a few other brands in there—some I’ll never buy again—but nothing compares with Kenworth.”

Today’s fleet owners have to do everything they can to lower operating costs and improve efficiencies. “Fuel economy is the name of the game right now,” Rallen said. “With our T2000s, we get between 6.5 and 7 mpg, and we’re expecting even better with the new T700s. It’s a great-looking truck. Image is very important to us, and the T700 gets your attention.”

Kenworth trucks have helped the company thrive during the economic slowdown. “In normal times, we try to trade our trucks every three to four years,” Rallen said. “In 2007, I saw this recession coming and made a decision not to buy any new trucks for an entire year. As a result, I now have some trucks crowding a million miles, and the Kenworths are still in good shape and proving reliable.”

As the economy attempts to gain traction, Rallen and Allen Zeitner are cautiously optimistic, and excited about the new Kenworth T700. “When the recession came, we were able to hold our own with Kenworth trucks,” said Rallen. “Kenworth is my truck. I like to drive Cadillacs, and I like to drive Kenworths.”

TAGS: Archive Meat
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